Spring Lecture Series 2019

May 1, 2019 – Corporate Social Responsibility and Consumer Response

Dr. Todd Green, Associate Professor of Marketing, Goodman School of Business, Brock University

The CIBC Run for the Cure, Home Depot’s partnership with Habitat for Humanity, and Ronald McDonald House are all high profile examples of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) engagement.

As the role of CSR has grown in importance for a number of stakeholders including consumers, job seekers, investors and regulators, it is important to understand when CSR works and when it falls flat.

Dr. Green’s work has focused on both consumer behaviour and advertising strategy in the CSR space. He will focus on the factors that consumers deem to be important in deciding whether or not to support CSR activities, and will also discuss how advertisers can best position and communicate how they are seeking to make a positive impact on society at large.

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May 8, 2019 – Small is Big: Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine

Dr. Gerald Audette, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Member of the Centre for Research on Biomolecular Interactions, York University

There has been a significant push in recent years toward the development of new ways to produce and store energy, generate interesting and useful materials and to diagnose and fight disease, by harnessing the potential of things at the nanoscale. There is certainly a lot of potential and a lot of buzz around all things “nano”.

But what is really going on when we move to smaller and smaller systems for technology and medicine? What can we learn from nature’s nano examples? And how do we tackle the new and often unanticipated implications to technology, health, safety, and the environment that nanoscale-based technology and medicine present?

Dr. Audette will provide an overview of several nanotechnology and nanomedicine examples and explore the opportunities, challenges, and pitfalls of going small to tackle big problems.

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May 15, 2019Leadership in International Development

Jos Nolle, Dean, Seneca International, Seneca College

What are the impacts of international development projects? What makes for an effective international development project? What type of leadership is needed? What is meant by internationalization of higher education?

Jos has done a variety of project evaluation tasks for the Rotary International Foundation in places as diverse as Mozambique, Ethiopia, Ecuador, Brazil, Mexico and Arizona. He will also share his experiences in his leadership roles in Doctors without Borders (Medecins sans Frontieres) and on behalf of two Canadian colleges in this field. He will explore how these overseas activities can bring positive impact back to learning institutions in Canada. You will leave this session with plenty to further reflect on.

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May 22, 2019 – The Sibelius Cycle

Bradley Thachuk, Music Director, Niagara Symphony Orchestra

The Niagara Symphony Orchestra is in the midst of its exploration of the works of Finland’s greatest composer, Jean Sibelius. In this entertaining illustrated talk, Bradley will explain the unique style of Sibelius musicality.

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May 29, 2019Managing Your Gut Microbial Army and Why It’s Important

Dr. Emma Allen-Vercoe, Professor, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph

Did you know that your gut harbours a vast super-city of microbes that is responsible for a good deal of your health? These invisible critters make up an entire virtual organ that until recently we have for the most part ignored to our great detriment. Only in the last few years has science finally started to scrutinize the world of this ‘gut microbiota’ and to unlock its secrets.

In this lecture, Dr. Allen-Vercoe will explain the importance of your gut microbes, debunk some myths, and provide some tips for keeping healthy.

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June 5, 2019The Teenage Brain Under Construction

Dr. Jean Clinton, Clinical Professor, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University

Over the past decade neuroscience has finally been able to shed light on why teenagers do the things they do!

This presentation will explore what has been learned about brain development and how the environment and experience plays a key role in this development.

The rise of mental illness among our Canadian youth, risk taking, novelty seeking, and risk of substance abuse will be explored.

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